Luncheon honors Armand Frank, who received his Eagle Scout award more than 73 years ago

 

Mayor AJ Hashmi presents the "Eagle Award" to Armand Frank, 88, of Paris, who attained the Eagle Scout rank in 1939. (eParisExtra.com photo by Charles Richards)

Mayor AJ Hashmi presents the “Eagle Award” to Armand Frank, 88, of Paris, who attained the Eagle Scout rank in 1939. (eParisExtra.com photo by Charles Richards)

The local Boy Scout organization kicked off its Friends of Scouting fund-raising campaign Wednesday with an “Honor The Eagle” luncheon that paid tribute to Armand Frank of Paris for his 73 years as an Eagle Scout.

“I appreciate this award. Scouting for me has been a lifetime thing. It started when I was about 15 years old, and I have been in it as both a young man and as an old man,” said Frank, 88, of 4030 Shannon, who received his Eagle Scout in 1939 in his hometown of Abbeville, La.

“I will continue to work in the Scouts as long as I can stand on my own two feet. Again, thank you very much for the honor,” said Frank, who was presented the Eagle Award by Paris mayor AJ Hashmi.

The event was held at the First United Methodist Church of Paris.

Frank came to Paris “30 or 40 years ago” as manager of the local Sears store, said David Hamilton, a Paris attorney and also an Eagle Scout. “He was with Sears, managing stores all over Texas, and Paris was his last assignment with Sears.”

Upon coming to Paris, Frank was invited to join the local board of directors of  the NETseO Trails Council and served on the board for 23 years.

Hashmi told the luncheon crowd that Frank “is a prime example of the influence that Boy Scouts have on the daily lives of those in the local community.”

Armand also served the Salvation Army and Rotary while continuing to serve as an adult scout in the local  council, the mayor said. Hashmi noted that the honoree has four sons in Scouting – two of whom attained the rank of Life Scout and two of whom attained the rank of Eagle Scouts.

The presentation was preceded by a Presentation of Colors by Troop 2, followed by the pledge of allegiance and the invocation by the Rev. Van Lazeroff, pastor of the First United Methodist Church.

Hamilton and Troop 2 Scoutmaster Mike Taylor gave examples of heroic acts and life skills demonstrated by local Scouts over the years.

Taylor finished with a plea for those present to participate in the “Friends of Scouting” fund-raising campaign.

NETseO Trails Council was chartered with the Boy Scouts of America in 1929. The council serves 1,700 youths in 13 counties – 10 in Texas and 3 in Oklahoma.

Ten local Eagle Scouts were on hand for an "Honor the Eagle" luncheon Wednesday honoring Armand Frank, who received his Eagle Scout award more than 73 years ago, in 1939. Shown from left are: (bottom row) Don Morris, David Hamilton, Bill Harris, Armand Frank, and Craig Stephens; and (top row) Kent Kirby, Ben Fowzer, Cliff Takawana, and Chip McEwin. (Present but not in the picture was Dave Bailey)

Ten local Eagle Scouts were on hand for an “Honor the Eagle” luncheon Wednesday honoring Armand Frank, who received his Eagle Scout award more than 73 years ago, in 1939. Shown from left are: (bottom row) Don Morris, David Hamilton, Bill Harris, Armand Frank, and Craig Stephens; and (top row) Kent Kirby, Ben Fowzer, Cliff Takawana, and Chip McEwin. (Present but not in the picture was Dave Bailey)

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By CHARLES RICHARDS

eParisExtra.com

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Charles Richards Charles Richards moved to Paris in 2004 after retiring from a 40-year career in journalism – the last 26 years as a news writer and sports writer with The Associated Press in Dallas and Washington, D.C. In mid-2004, The Paris News coaxed him out of retirement, and he began covering the police, court and regional beat for The Paris News. Then in early 2005, he was switched to coverage of a sharply divided Paris City Council. He was appointed by the City Council in 2006 to the 12-member City Charter Review Commission, which extensively rewrote the outmoded document. His writing awards include two first-place awards in statewide competition for feature writing. The most recent was his 2005 story on a Paris doctor’s startling use of leeches in a successful attempt to re-attach a man’s severed ear. Over his career, Richards’ interview subjects include Alabama Gov. George Wallace, President Bill Clinton, President George W. Bush, David Koresh, Arnold Palmer, Muhammad Ali and numerous other political and sports figures. He is an alumnus of Texas Tech, where he was editor of the school newspaper. He lives in Paris with his wife, Barbara, who is retired after 30 years as a teacher and high school counselor.