PJC students Find Learning Opportunities Outside the Classroom

Searching for fossils in the North Sulphur River are PJC student Marc Mercier of Roxton (left) and Forrest Lane of Honey Grove as PJC geology instructor Mike Barnett looks on.

Searching for fossils in the North Sulphur River are PJC student Marc Mercier of Roxton (left) and Forrest Lane of Honey Grove as PJC geology instructor Mike Barnett looks on.

Not all lessons for Paris Junior College students are taught in the classrooms, as both jewelry and science course students found out last semester. For both disciplines, students were able to bring back insights from the field.

A treasure hunt of sorts was on tap for PJC biology and geology students when they went looking for fossils along the North Sulphur River. That location provides outstanding opportunities to find shallow Marine Cretaceous fossils. Upper layers in the banks contain Pleistocene fossils such as mammoth teeth and bones.

Led by PJC biology instructor Jack Brown and geology instructor Mike Barnett, the group found fossils such as exogyra ponderosa, sand shark teeth, enchodus teeth (a fish also known as a saber tooth herring), a mososaur tooth, gastropod fossils, and exogyra costata (saltwater oysters).

The majors’ biology class went into detail on geologic history, evolutionary theory and the process of fossilization. The geology class also covered geological time periods and fossilization. Students from both classes learned by visiting the nearby location that the area was a shallow sea 90 million years ago.

“We have many fossils of extinct marine creatures that lived in shallow seas,” said Brown. “You can see the layers of time in the banks of the river and even see when they went extinct. The layers the marine creatures are in wash out, but many are still buried in the sides of the banks so you can dig in and find marine fossils from 90-70 million years ago. It is a wonderful way to get students to comprehend deep time and the changes that have occurred in the planet’s history.”

Attending a jeweler’s workshop at Stuller, Inc. in Lafayette, Louisiana, was a big plus for PJC’s Texas Institute of Jewelry Technology students. Stuller is the largest jewelry manufacturer in America.

“It was an amazing experience to be able to meet and network with professionals face to face in the largest jewelry manufacturing business in America,” said jewelry student association event coordinator Ricardo Ruiz. “PJC students were able to make many contacts for their future careers.”

Attendees were taken on a tour of the facilities, attended classes and interactive demonstrations as well as a tool sale. The trip left students excited and ready to get back to the bench to try all the new techniques they learned.

PJC nursing students receive scholarships from Roan Oak Masonic Lodge

Four Paris Junior College associate degree-nursing students have received $500 scholarships from the Roan Oak Masonic Lodge #860 of Garrett’s Bluff, Texas.

Receiving the scholarships are nursing students Danielle Gerhardt of Honey Grove and Kristi Baggett, Clayton Hanley and Sheila Sikes, all of Paris.

Four PJC nursing students are shown at the presentation of $500 scholarships from the Roan Oak Masonic Lodge #860 of Garrett’s Bluff, Texas. Left to right are: Clayton Hanley and Sheila Sikes of Paris, Lodge Secretary James Parsons, Lodge Worshipful Master Mike Parsons, Danielle Gerhardt of Honey Grove, Kristi Baggett of Paris and PJC Director of Health Occupations Marcia Putnam.

Four PJC nursing students are shown at the presentation of $500 scholarships from the Roan Oak Masonic Lodge #860 of Garrett’s Bluff, Texas. Left to right are: Clayton Hanley and Sheila Sikes of Paris, Lodge Secretary James Parsons, Lodge Worshipful Master Mike Parsons, Danielle Gerhardt of Honey Grove, Kristi Baggett of Paris and PJC Director of Health Occupations Marcia Putnam.

On hand for the presentation were Worshipful Master of the Lodge Mike Parsons and Lodge Secretary James Parsons.   “We do this so the kids can get through school,” said James Parsons. He explained that the lodge holds fundraisers to raise the money throughout the year.

“Many of our nursing students have been helped by Roan Oak Masonic Lodge scholarships,” said PJC Health Occupations Director Marcia Putnam. “The scholarships assist with expenses such as tuition, books and living expenses. The program is demanding, and to be successful students must devote time to their studies.”

As the students expressed their gratitude to the lodge representatives, Secretary Parsons charged them with a mission to finish their education.

Roan Oak Masonic Lodge wants to assist the community and support the students so they may go on to help others in the community.

The lodge’s major fundraiser, a fish fry at Garrett’s Bluff, is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 27 and everyone is invited to attend. For information about the event, call 903-732-4035.

For more information about PJC nursing programs call 903-782-0734.

 

 

 

Deport Masonic Lodge donates PJC jewelry student scholarship

pjc jewelry scholarshipThe Deport Masonic Lodge recently presented a $500 scholarship to Brittany Bean, a student attending the Paris Junior College Texas Institute of Jewelry Technology.

Fred Fangio, a member of the lodge’s scholarship committee, presented the scholarship to Bean.

“We are pleased that the Lodge can assist Brittany with her training in the Texas Institute for Jewelry Technology and hope we will have opportunities to help other students in the future,” said Fangio.

Also attending the presentation was PJC Institutional Advancement/Alumni Affairs Director Derald Bulls (at left).

PJC Board of Regents bids farewell, swears in new member

PJC Board President Curtis Fendley is shown presenting outgoing regent Frankie Norwood a plaque of appreciation for his 23 years service.

PJC Board President Curtis Fendley is shown presenting outgoing regent Frankie Norwood a plaque of appreciation for his 23 years service.

A plaque of appreciation was presented to outgoing Paris Junior College regent Frankie Norwood at the PJC Board of Regents’ meeting on June 30th by PJC Board President Curtis Fendley, who thanked him for 23 years of dedication to the community and the college.

“My daddy said, ‘son, the decisions that you have to make, always use what knowledge you have, but always ripen it with common wisdom.’ I hope that’s what I did in these 23 years. I’ve enjoyed serving at PJC, and saw a lot of changes,” said Norwood. “Continue to keep PJC strong, viable and affordable for all our kids because it’s the greatest place here.”

Incoming regent Jim Bell was sworn in, and the board elected officers to two-year terms by acclamation.

Newly-elected regent Jim Bell is shown being sworn in to represent Place 7

Newly-elected regent Jim Bell is shown being sworn in to represent Place 7

 

 

Fendley was reelected to serve two more years, as was Board Secretary Berdie Gibson. Regent Ann Wyche was elected Vice President.

The regents heard of an articulation agreement under negotiation from PJC biology instructor Jack Brown, who also heads PJC’s biomedical sciences program. Brown briefed the regents the agreement will be with The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.

“They came to visit and liked how modern our labs are,” said Brown. “This articulation agreement will greatly expand the options for PJC students.”

When finalized, the agreement will be similar to the one PJC has with the biomedical science program within the College of Veterinary Medicine at Texas A&M University-College Station. For both institutions, successful completion of PJC’s biomedical sciences program guarantees entree into highly competitive programs.

In other business, the Board of Regents:

·      Received a positive financial report from PJC Controller Keitha Carlton, who reported that PJC remains in a strong cash position and in line with budgeted amounts.

·      Received a report on Summer I semester enrollment showing the number of students is up 18 percent from one year ago, and 16 percent from two years ago. The number of contact hours increased four percent from a year ago and 9.8 percent from two years ago. Paris has 1,680 students (online students are included in the Paris total); Greenville has 344 and Sulphur Springs 193.

·      Approved the bids for sale of tax write-off property.

·      Approved conveyance of 20 acres at S.W. 19th and Washington streets to Paris Independent School District to serve as trustee for the PJC, City of Paris and Paris ISD’s taxing units. In separate action, the board also approved the re-sale of that same property by PISD to the City of Paris for $1.

·      Accepted a bid to provide athletic insurance for play and practice insurance and catastrophic insurance from Norment & Landers.

·      Approved two of three companies bidding to supply welding equipment to PJC with funds from a recently received Jobs and Education for Texans grant. Matheson and AirGas will provide equipment from the list.

·      Received a report on fall and spring enrollment and retention by course. The fall completion rate is 93.76 percent and the spring retention rate is 93.53 percent.

·      Received an accountability report from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board that showed 81 percent of PJC students are from out of district. Seventeen percent live in district, and the remaining two percent are out of state or international students.

·      Approved the purchase of a building on East Loop 301 in Sulphur Springs.

·      Approved the employment of Daniel Goodman and Wayne Snelling as instructors of Computer Information Systems, both effective Aug. 18, and the resignation and retirement of Harrel Harrison as Instructor of Jewelry Technologies effective Aug. 31 and Teri Zamora as Vice President of Business Services effective June 11.

 

 

 

PJC has two NJCAA 2013-2014 All-Academic Teams

Pyro_PJC_SliderFor the second year in a row, scholar-athletes at Paris Junior College have brought home the designation of 2013-2014 All-Academic Teams from the National Junior College Athletic Association.

Both the baseball and softball teams were recognized, as well as several individual players.

There were 3,705 teams in 28 different sports competing in the NJCAA during the 2013-2014 academic year. Teams had to achieve above a 3.0 on a 4.0 grade-point average (GPA) scale to earn the accolade.

PJC’s softball team earned a cumulative GPA of 3.34. “These girls are a great representation of what Paris Junior College and the softball program are about,” said PJC softball coach Angel Castro. “They are committed, hardworking young women both in the classroom and on the field.”

PJC’s baseball team had a cumulative GPA of 3.33.  “Our team stepped up in the class room as well as on the field,” said PJC baseball coach and athletic director Deron Clark. “This is our second consecutive Academic All American Team honor and the players are buying into the challenge of earning this award and getting their academic careers started on the right foot. Each player and their families should be very proud of the accomplishments this team has earned.”

In addition to the team honors, four PJC baseball players earned individual academic recognition. Those earning the title of Exemplary Academic Achievement for GPAs between 3.6 and 3.79 include: Connor Lee of Magnolia; Mathew Lusk of Texarkana; Ryan Pulsifer of Frisco; and Harrison Spruiell of Shreveport, Louisiana. S

everal PJC softball players had the GPAs to be recognized, but were not sophomores which was also required. The NJCAA has been annually recognizing the academic success of student-athletes for 31 years.